A New Birth of Freedom?

   Welcome to the 15th annual High Plains Chautauqua, a living history festival that recreates the traveling tent Chautauqua tradition of the early 20th century. The August 5-9, 2014 festival theme is A New Birth of Freedom? and coincides with the national commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. The program will explore the ramifications of the Civil War and Reconstruction and explore themes including racial and gender equality and the impact of westward expansion.

 

Addresses

 

Aims Community College, 5401 W. 20th St.

(The Big Tent on Athletic Field, Ed Beaty Hall)    

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Farr Branch Library, 1939  61st Ave.

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Family Fun Plex, 1501 65th Ave.

 

Greeley History Museum, 714  8th St.

*

Greeley Senior Activities Center, 1010  6th St.

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Kress Cinema and Lounge, 817  8th Ave.

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Lincoln Park, 8 th St. and 10 th Ave.

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Monfort Children’s Clinic, 100 North 11th Ave.

 

For a map of downtown Greeley and parking, go to www.greeleydowntown.com

 

 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 5

YOUTH PROGRAM

(4th & 5th grades)

Monfort Children’s Clinic

Community Room

100 North 11th Ave.

 

2:00 – 3:00 p.m.

Disaster Preparedness                                             

Susan Marie Frontczak

Clara Barton created the American Red Cross after the Civil War to help communities recover from disasters such as flood, epidemic, fire, and hurricanes. She knew that the best way to handle a disaster is to be prepared for one. Do you know what you would do first if your home were threatened by a flood, fire, or tornado? You can help your family and your community by finding out how to be prepared. This workshop has three parts. First learn a little about what the Red Cross is (and isn't) and how it serves in disasters. Second, work on a team to prepare a plan for your family in case of one of these disasters. Third, brainstorm your “next steps” on how to bring what you have learned to your community.

 

KICKOFF RECEPTION

5:30 – 7:00 p.m.

By invitation only for sponsors, Chautauqua scholars, Young Chautauquans, presenters, and volunteers.  Become a High Plains Chautauqua donor or volunteer and you, too, will be invited to this lively annual kickoff.

Buffet sponsored by Cables Pub & Grill

Music by Back Home                                                

Three women who have been performing Celtic, Appalachian, world and folk music for more than seven years, Back Home’s instrumentals incorporate fiddle, guitar, hammered dulcimer, and several other instruments to help recreate the atmosphere that means “Back Home” to their audiences. Their vocals feature Lesley Manring, former vocal professor at the UNC School of Music, with Ann Ratcliffe and Naomi Johnson filling in with background harmonies. This year, in honor of the High Plains Chautauqua, they have added several Civil War tunes to their repertoire and hope that you enjoy their renditions.

 

 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 5

EVENING PROGRAMS 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Under the Big Tent

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th Street

              

7:00 – 7:45 p.m.

Young Chautauqua Cameos

Sponsored by Advantage Bank

 

ANDREW JOHNSON (1808-1875)                            

by Martin Lahman

 

MARY CHESNUT (1823-1886)

by Kathryn Broderius

 

THADDEUS STEVENS (1792-1868)

by Dante Quezada

 

7:50 – 9:00 pm

ABRAHAM LINCOLN (1809-1865)

by Dennis Boggs

Sponsored by Noble Energy, Inc.

 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6

8:00 – 9:15 a.m.

Coffee & Conversation

with Chautauquan Dennis Boggs

Ed Beaty Hall Student Lounge

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

 

ADULT PROGRAMS

Ed Beaty Hall Black Box Theatre

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

 

9:30 – 10:30 a.m.                                                                   

“When Freedom Come”: African Americans in the Reconstruction South       

Patricia L. Richard

As African Americans carved out a new life for themselves in the postwar South, they tried to achieve freedom and happiness but were met with resistance by those who hoped to maintain the status quo. “When Freedom Come” examines the meaning of freedom, the restructuring of Black people’s lives, their achievements and their obstacles to change. 

Patricia Richard is an Associate Professor of American History at Metropolitan State University of Denver. She teaches courses on the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction, the U.S. and Vietnam, Film as Social History and U.S. history survey courses at Metro and other universities in the United States. She received her Ph.D. from Marquette University in 2001. She published her first book Busy Hands: Images of the Family in the Northern Civil War Effort with Fordham University Press in2003. She has written articles concerning Northern women’s war work for national journals and presented the research at historical conferences around the country. She is currently working on African American Soldiers’ Aid Societies and the interconnections between homefront, battlefront, and race relations in the North during the Civil War. 

 

10:45 – 11:45 a.m.                                                     

Abraham Lincoln – The Election of 1864

Dennis Boggs as Abraham Lincoln

The Civil War has been raging for over three long years and even with the victories at Gettysburg and Vicksburg in July 1863, there seems to be no end in sight. The people of the country, both North and South, are growing tired and weary of the seemingly endless loss of lives. President Lincoln’s term of office will soon be coming to an end, and he must now make what will be his greatest decision since signing the Emancipation Proclamation. Should he walk away and let someone else take over what seems to be the impossible job of saving the nation, or will he run for another term, knowing that his chances of winning are at this time highly unlikely? Also, if someone else takes over, will that individual give in to the demands of the Southern states and the leave the nation divided?

 

1:00 – 2:00 p.m.                                                         

Civil War Medicine

Susan Marie Frontczak

To say that, by today's standards, medical care during the Civil War was lacking is an understatement. But what was it really like? Take a brief tour from the points of view of the ambulance driver, the surgeon, the nurse, and the soldier. Learn what tools and medicines were available and how they were used. Gain a sense what it would be like for those dragged off the battlefield, from poignant losses to miraculous incidents of survival. Warning: includes graphic images and content; not for the squeamish.

 

2:15 – 3:15 p.m.                                                         

Union Colored Troops, Freedmen, and Contrabands

Larry Clowers as General Ulysses S. Grant

When the Emancipation Proclamation came into effect in January 1863, the General was among the first to deploy these troops in a combat role instead of laborers. Prior to 1863, slaves who left their masters followed the Union army as they marched south. Grant utilized these laborers as no other General by employing and paying wages for their service to the Union. The use of Colored troops was not popular, but now as part of the Union army, Grant treated these newly enlisted men as United States soldiers. After 1863, the new United States Colored Troops serving in all theaters of the American Civil War and in the post-war army were enlisted as regular United States soldiers.

 

YOUTH PROGRAM

Family FunPlex

1501  65th Ave.

3:00 - 4:00 p.m.                                                                     

Br’er Rabbit and Dancing Rabbit: Stories for Survival and Freedom

Michael Hughes

Across four centuries and an ocean, the West African stories of Anansi the Spider encountered those of Grandmother Spider and other American Indian “tricksters.” These stories intertwined with the African American Br'er Rabbit and American Indian Dancing Rabbit tales. This workshop offers a chance to hear stories of all these characters and to compare them. At heart, all of the stories contained lessons on how to survive and even gain freedom under oppression.


 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6

YOUNG CHAUTAUQUA PRESENTATIONS                       

Under the Big Tent

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.   

ALL AGES

 

High Plains Chautauqua is proud to present our Young Chautauqua scholars. These students have spent months reading, researching, and presenting their characters to different audiences. Young Chautauqua is a Colorado Humanities program that has been developed and supported by Greeley-Evans School District 6. Since the program began 14 years ago, approximately 10,300 local students have participated, either as audience members or by researching and presenting a character.

This year, about 300 students participated in 19 school programs. Teachers at each participating school worked with Young Chautauqua scholars. In addition, a Colorado Humanities-trained coach worked with students and teachers to teach the Young Chautauqua model of learning history and to refine presentation skills of those who chose to present a character. Today’s portrayals are a sampling of the talented students who researched and developed a wide and interesting array of historic characters.                   

 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6

EVENING PROGRAMS

5:45 – 9:00 p.m.

Under the Big Tent

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

 

6:00 – 6:50 p.m.                                                         

Music has always had a special way of bringing us all together on common ground and healing past hurts and painful memories. The soulful songs of 19th century Appalachia are no exception. Camp Daddy & Son will entertain you with music that was born in old Appalachia, as well as new music they have written to reflect its Welsh, Scottish and Irish roots.

 

7:00 p.m.

LOUISA MAY ALCOTT (1832-1888)

by Amelia Wagner

 

8:05 p.m.

ROBERT E. LEE (1807-1870)

by David Chaltas

Sponsored by Halliburton

 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 7

ADULT PROGRAMS

Ed Beaty Hall Black Box Theatre

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

 

8:00 – 9:15 a.m.

Coffee & Conversation with Chautauquans

Amelia Wagner and David Chaltas

Ed Beaty Hall Student Lounge

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

 

9:30 – 10:30 a.m.                                                                   

The Freedman’s Bureau and the Triumphs of Reconstruction

Bill Grimmette

From the founding of our nation’s constitution in 1787, the experience of freedom in America was principally distributed along racial, gender and class lines. The drivers of this segregated access to freedom’s bounty were men self-selected to interpret, judge and enforce the boundaries between birthright, entitlement and heritable exclusion. When the Civil War ended and the victors sought to synchronize the practices of our civilization with the principles of the constitution, they met with both triumph and failure.

This workshop will engage participants in a wondrous exploration of the triumphs of Reconstruction, arbitrarily defined as practices created for Reconstruction yet enduring over time and enriching all regardless of historical exclusions. While we will touch on some of the more egregious attempts to suppress the gains of Reconstruction, we seek to do so only to show how they strengthened the triumphs. When we are done, participants will be able to decide conclusively whether to punctuate the prophecy of “A new birth of freedom” by President Lincoln with a question mark (?) or an exclamation (!).

 

10:45 – 11:45 a.m.                                                                   

Louisa May Alcott’s Childhood

Amelia Wagner

Many of Louisa’s ideas about childhood and education came from her upbringing. Louisa’s father, Bronson Alcott, was a great philosopher, transcendentalist thinker, and teacher, and the family regularly interacted with such esteemed characters as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Nathaniel Hawthorne. The Alcott girls’ education was, therefore, revolutionary for the time in many ways. This seminar will present the impact transcendentalism had on Louisa’s education and some of the ways it still impacts education today.

 

1:00 – 2:00 p.m.                                                                     

The 4th U.S. Artillery Regimental Band

Norman Hughes

The Colorado Frontier Army Band
“Music hath charms. . . .” So the old saying goes, and this is no more true than in the 19th century. Music, though, cannot really be understood without knowing the culture and history of that music. The musicians of the Colorado Frontier Army Band enjoy playing and performing the music of this fascinating period. They combine the music in their programs with descriptions, anecdotes, and sources to give context to the melodies. Dance, clothing, and the social mores of the time are included. The 19th century is full of momentous events including: the Mexican/American war, the abolition of slavery, the western frontier expansion, the statehood of Colorado, and, of course, the Civil War. Each of these has its own “background music.”

 

2:15 – 3:15 p.m.                                                                     

Mark Twain’s Westward Movement

George Frein as Mark Twain

Mark Twain will tell of how his life experiences reflected the epitome of the westward movement when he went to Nevada territory at the beginning of the Civil War. Twain took the stagecoach out west to Carson City, Nevada where his western adventures included (in addition to avoiding military service) prospecting and journalism. After an adventure further west in Hawaii, he moved to New York and then to Connecticut where he wrote about life on the frontier in Missouri, Nevada, California and Hawaii.

 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 7

EVENING PROGRAMS

5:45 – 9:00 p.m.

Under the Big Tent

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

 

5:45 – 6:50 p.m.                                                                     

John Mills Orchestra

The John Mills Orchestra will provide a selection of music that was prevalent throughout the Civil War and the period afterwards, leading up to the 19th century. There will also be a few selections that will provide sing-a-long opportunities for the audience.

 

7:00 p.m.

CHIEF JOHN ROSS (1790-1866)

by Michael Hughes

Sponsored by Myra Monfort-Runyan

 

8:05 p.m.

PRESIDENT ULYSSES S. GRANT (1822-1885)

by Larry Clowers

 

 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 8

ADULT PROGRAMS

Greeley Senior Activities Center

Dining Room

1010  6th St.

**Normal parking restrictions in the Senior Activities Center parking lot will be waived during HPC programs on Friday, August 8.  Entry to the lot is on 6th Street, between 10th and 11th Avenues.

 

8:00 – 9:15 a.m.

Coffee & Conversation with Chautauquans

Michael Hughes and Larry Clowers

 

9:30 – 10:30 a.m.                                                                         

Southern Life Before and After the “Late Unpleasantness”

David Chaltas as General Robert E. Lee

Listen to Robert Edward Lee describe life at Arlington before the war and the struggles of being a citizen without a country. Lee describes family life, his wife’s heritage, and his mother-in-law’s efforts in teaching the slaves and her role in attempting to gain their freedom. His backward glance leads to discussing losing everything but maintaining his honor. 

 

10:45 – 11:45 a.m.                                                                 

The West During the Civil War

Michael Hughes

Did the withdrawal of soldiers to fight battles back East ignite the conflicts that took place between the Indians and both Federal and Confederate troops during the Civil War? Did the participation of Colorado and other western volunteers restore peace or make future bloodshed inevitable? This workshop will explore these large issues while offering a concise look at some of the “little wars” fought from the Great Plains to the Rockies.  

 

1:00 – 2:00 p.m.                                                                     

The Influence of Spiritualism in the 19th Century

Tillie Newman

Victoria Woodhull, as well as many other influential men and women of the time period, made a living for most of her life as a spiritualist. Ever-present death was a subject that dominated Victorian society and was regarded with great respect and curiosity. People of all genders, ages, religions, and social classes participated in the spiritualist movement, from Mary Todd Lincoln to Queen Victoria, making it the most prominent and dynamic vehicle for social change. Come examine the myths and truths about spiritualism and learn about its impact on American society.  

 

2:15 – 3:15 p.m.                                                                     

Mark Twain’s Gilded Age Illustrated        

George Frein as Mark Twain

Mark Twain himself will appear and will talk about the post-Civil War era. It was a time when great fortunes were made. People spoke of it as a “golden age.” But Twain said it was only a “gilded age” – the gold was only gilding, only fool’s gold. His 1873 novel, The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today, named the post-war era. It now raises the question: Is it still a tale of today? Like most of his books, the novel was illustrated and his lecture today will also be illustrated.

 

YOUTH PROGRAM

(Ages 8 - 12)

Farr Branch Library

1939  61st Ave.

 

2:00 – 3:00 p.m.                                                                     

Write Like Louisa May Alcott

Amelia Wagner

Louisa May Alcott is perhaps best known for her beloved children’s stories. One of the most popular of these was Little Women, based largely on Louisa’s life growing up with her three sisters. Writers often base their works on personal life experiences. This workshop will encourage children to craft their own life experiences into stories. It will involve a discussion of Alcott’s practice of journaling and will allow children to try their hand at several different writing prompts, as well as the opportunity to workshop their stories.

 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 8

EVENING PROGRAMS

6:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Under the Big Tent

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

 

5:30 – 7:00 p.m.  Food Vending Tent: Southern fried chicken

 

5:45 – 6:45 p.m.

Greeley Chorale

Spirituals and Civil War Songs                                  

The internationally renowned Greeley Chorale presents a program of true Civil War era music, taken from collections in the Library of Congress. The program will include traditional spirituals, folk songs, and maybe even some patriotic numbers. Peformers include soloists, as well as a larger group, and some combinations of the two. The arrangements of the spirituals and folk songs of 19th century African Americans are some of the earliest written by such well-known composers as Harry Burleigh and Nathaniel Dett. Selections include “There is a Balm in Gilead,” “Beautiful Dreamer,” “Camptown Races,” “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,”  “Old Folks at Home,” “Hard Times Come Again No More,” and many more!

Special Note: The Greeley Chorale kicks off its 50th anniversary season, “50 Years of Song: Only the Beginning!” on October 10. Tickets are on sale at the Chorale Chautauqua booth and at the UCCC ticket office, 970-356-5000,1-800-315-ARTS. or  at greeleychorale.org.

                                   

7:00 pm

FREDERICK DOUGLASS (1818-1895)

by Bill Grimmette

 

8:05 p.m.

CLARA BARTON (1821-1912)

by Susan Marie Frontczak

Sponsored by North Colorado Medical Center/ Banner Health

 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 9

8:00 – 9:15 a.m.

Coffee & Conversation with Chautauquans Bill Grimmette and Susan

Marie Frontczak

Kress Cinema Lounge

817  8th Ave.

 

ADULT PROGRAMS

Morning at the Kress Cinema

817  8th Ave.

          

9:30 – 10:30 a.m.                                                                   

The Blue and the Gray on the Silver Screen

David Caldwell

American filmmakers have been fascinated with the Civil War since the earliest days of cinema. Films such as Gone with the Wind have become part of Hollywood’s enduring legacy, and movies set during the time of Lincoln have helped shaped the way we think of America’s most wrenching internal conflict.  Hollywood has also registered the mark the Civil War has left on us a century and a half after Appomattox. Join a conversation with film expert David Caldwell as he looks at how the movies have dealt with the battle between the Blue and the Gray. With a little scratching on the surface of the silver screen, movie-goers will discover the war’s persistent aftermath and what it says about us today.

Professor David Caldwell teaches at the University of Northern Colorado. He helped establish a program in Film Studies at UNC and also offers courses in the Department of Modern Languages. In addition to his work with international cinema, Dr. Caldwell considers ways in which American films help tell national and global narratives. His film festival jaunts take him to Berlin, Germany and Telluride, Colorado, but closer to home you may find him with a bag of popcorn at the Kress Cinema. Lunch available for purchase at The Kress. Sign-ups to reserve your lunch will be available throughout the week.

 

10:45 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.                                                          

Slavery by Another Name

Post-film discussion facilitated by Bill Grimmette

Slavery By Another Name, a docudrama based on the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book by Douglas Blackmon, tells the story of a vast Southern conspiracy of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting black men, that lasted until World War II. The book reveals a shocking reality of innocent men charged with vagrancy crimes for the purpose of being bought, sold, abused and subjected to deadly working conditions as unpaid convict labor.

When Grimmette was growing up in Sylacauga, Alabama in the 1940’s, he overheard stories whispered by his mother that his father was in jail when Grimmette was born. He had been sentenced to 6 months hard labor by a “Justice of the Peace” with no hope of escaping the inevitable result. Grimmette’s father was a preacher and not a violent man but character carried no weight; he was arrested for “not knowing his place.” Fortunately, his father worked at Avondale Mills and word passed from Donald Comer to have him released. Grimmette did not know the existence of this quasi-slavery system nor how close it hit home to his family until he read this book. In this discussion, he will share some stories he heard from family elders and ones that he experienced long after the convict lease system was “technically” abandoned. This session will explore remnants from this system that endure over time and have made their way into the present day.

Afternoon: Greeley Senior Activities Center Dining Room, 1010  6th St.                                                                                                                     


1:15 – 2:15 p.m.                                                         

President Lee: The College Years

David Chaltas as Robert E. Lee

In this presentation, Lee discusses the aftermath of the war and its impact on the South. He was destitute and took a job as president of Washington College in Lexington, Virginia, where he embraced education as the saving grace of the South. Through Lee’s eyes the audience will be able to grasp a better understanding of the importance education played in the Reconstruction era. Lee’s leadership not only at the college but his role of being the “man of marble” resigned to complying to the reunification of the country will be discussed through reflections of his life during that five-year time frame. 

 

2:30 – 3:30 p.m.                                                         

Westward Expansion

Larry Clowers as President Ulysses S. Grant

Beginning with a short history of the westward expansion and the part he played as General and now as President, this lecture will follow the Westward Movement after the Civil War and Grant’s attempts to settle the West and establish peace between the Native tribes, settlers, and the Army. As friction increased, numerous wars broke out throughout the West. When elected President in 1868, Grant campaigned for funding for Indian treaties and sought ways to find peace between the peoples of the West. Grant’s last year in office, 1876, proved to be his most memorable year, cumulating in the battle of Little Bighorn and the admission of Colorado as the 38th state in the Union.

 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 9 - Evening Program
 

6:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Under the Big Tent, Aims Community College

 

5:30 – 7:00 p.m.  Food Vending Tent: Burgers and Brats

 

6:00 – 6:50 p.m.                                                                     

Sharon Guli Productions

Dance of the Reconstruction Period                                      

Join us for an entertaining presentation of “Dances of the Reconstruction Period,” pulled straight from dance manuals of 1863-1877. Including a demonstration of dances such as the Steamboat Quickstep, The Ninepin Quadrille, and of course, the classic “Ole Virginny Reel.”  In addition to the dance exhibitions, topics will be shared such as “Bows and Courtesies,” ballroom “Manners and Etiquette,” and even a mini fashion show of styles popular during this period of American history. Inspired in part by an original Ball Programme from Texas in 1874, this program offers a glimpse of the flavor of the ballroom during our country’s post-Civil War era.

           

7:00 p.m.

VICTORIA WOODHULL (1838-1927)

by Tillie Newman

 

8:05 p.m.

MARK TWAIN (1835-1910)

by George Frein

Sponsored by High Plains Library District