Program/Music Descriptions

Echoes of World War I

Welcome to the 18th annual High Plains Chautauqua, a living history festival that recreates the traveling tent Chautauqua tradition of the early 20th century. In recognition of the 100th anniversary of the U.S. entrance into the First World War, the 2017 festival theme is Echoes of World War I. This epic event not only ushered in the age of modern warfare but also gave rise to a new economic, political and cultural world order. The program will examine both America’s participation in the war and its continuing impact on the lives of all Americans.

Addresses

Aims Community College, 5401 W. 20th St.

The Big Tent on Athletic Field, Cornerstone Building  

(Please note: NO turns will be allowed out of the Cornerstone Parking lot onto 20th street.  All traffic will be directed to the 47th Avenue exit.)

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Farr Branch Library, 1939  61st Ave.

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Greeley Senior Activities Center, 1010  6th St.

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Kress Cinema and Lounge, 817  8th Ave.

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Monfort Children’s Clinic, 100 North 11th Ave.

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Sunrise Neighborhood Walking Tour starting point: SW corner of 12th St. & 4th Ave.

 

For a map of downtown Greeley and parking, go to www.greeleydowntown.com

 

TUESDAY, AUGUST 1

 

KICKOFF RECEPTION

5:30 to 7:00 pm

By invitation only for sponsors, Chautauqua scholars, Young Chautauquans, presenters, and volunteers

Buffet sponsored by Cables Pub & Grill

Music by The Hoagies

The Hoagies perform the great music of The American Century, focusing on swing favorites from Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole, Billie Holiday, Louis Jordan, and the great songwriting talent Hoagy Carmichael. The combo has performed up and down the Front Range since 2004, and they are thrilled to make their third appearance at High Plains Chautauqua. Three members of the band will perform for Chautauqua – Scott Johnson leading on guitar, Bill Pontarelli shining on clarinet, and Dave Ball providing the foundation on string bass.

 

Become a High Plains Chautauqua donor and you, too, will be invited to this lively annual kickoff.

 

EVENING PROGRAMS

7:00 to 9:00 pm

Under the Big Tent

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th Street

 

7:00 to 7:15 pm

Young Chautauqua Cameo

MARY PICKFORD

by Madrigal Frederick-Law

 

EVENING PROGRAMS

7:15 pm

MUSTAFA KEMAL ATATÜRK (1881 - 1938)

by Dr. J. Holmes Armstead

 

8:20 pm

WINSTON CHURCHILL (1874 - 1965)

by Dr. Kevin Radaker

Sponsored by the Richard and Mary Kemme Family Foundation

 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2
 

8:00 to 9:15 am

Coffee & Conversation with Chautauquans Dr. Kevin Radaker, Dr. J. Holmes Armstead and Young Chautauquan Madrigal Frederick-Law

Cornerstone Building, Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

 

ADULT PROGRAMS

Cornerstone Building, Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

                                                                     

9:30 to 10:30 am

A More Perfect Union

Judd Bankert as Woodrow Wilson                                      

Before he entered politics, President Wilson had spent twenty-five years in higher education, first as a college professor of history and jurisprudence and later as the President of Princeton University.   During this time one of Wilson’s most significant contributions to the new discipline of political science was his Darwinian model of the evolutionary influences exerted by external forces, the political “environment,” on governmental institutions. Wilson saw the Declaration of Independence as the formative document of the American political system and its preeminent principle as the right of the people to alter or abolish their government when it did not serve them. Wilson believed the most significant right of a free people was “to institute new government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness.” As a leader of the progressive movement he felt that as the world changed so must the institutions that served its people.

Join Professor Wilson as he explains his theories on political evolution as he consolidated them in 1908 in his final academic thesis, “Constitutional Government of the United States.”  Hear him explain the need for a “living” Constitution, and share his vision of the unique role the President.

 

10:45 to 11:45

The Political Reality of late 19th Century Europe

J. Holmes Armstead                                                              

The Great War marks a beginning of the modern era politically or perhaps more correctly the post- modern international era, and in some ways a settlement of the old order. That old order, or as it is more usually termed in late 19th Century Europe, the Imperial World of the late 19th Century, was a culmination of nation-state organization that developed after the

Thirty Year’s War and brought some settlement to political, religious and territorial squabbles by allowing regionally dominant ethnicities to establish dynastic hegemony across Europe. 

After the convulsions of the Napoleonic Wars, the political situation was solidified by the Treaty of Vienna and the attempt was made to preserve the existing order with a balance of power among the Great Powers over the next Century. Some have mistakenly termed  the next century the Peace of Vienna but it was far from that. As states realigned, alliances were formed, and overseas colonial territories added, all of which marked changes in the economic and political balance of Europe, and made for raw new tensions as some states with a "place in the Sun" benefited masterfully in the industrialization process by using relatively cheap natural resources from colonial territories to fuel their respective economies vis-a-vis competitors sans colonial aggrandizement. Those tensions built and festered and the cataclysm of the Great War ensued and set the stage for a tragic aftermath in the 20th Century.

 

1:00 to 2:00 pm                                                                             

Schools as Prisons and Prisons as Schools                          

Sally Ann Drucker as Emma Goldman

Emma Goldman felt that schools were used to break the will of the child, promote uniformity, and inhibit initiative and originality. Today, does “teaching to the test” do this? When Goldman wrote and lectured, people also debated the role of education in creating informed voters, assimilating immigrants, and preparing people for the work force. Is the debate about these issues the same today? From her jail experiences, Goldman learned that most criminals were illiterate. She saw prison reform and education as inevitably linked. Is it true now? In this workshop, we’ll discuss Goldman’s ideals on education and how realistic they might or might not be today. 

                                                     

2:15 to 3:30 pm

Echoes of the Great War in Remarque’s Fiction

George Frein                                                              

Erich Maria Remarque fought in the German army during World War I and experienced trench warfare firsthand. After living for ten years with frightful memories from that war, he wrote All Quiet of the Western Front. It is arguably the most famous war novel of all time.

Many people read All Quiet on the Western Front in high school or college. But very few people know that Remarque went on to write ten more novels, all of which echo with ideas and themes from his first book.

This illustrated program will examine the powerful echoes of World War I that can be found in Remarque’s subsequent novels. These same echoes can still be heard in military and political events in our world today. Hearing these echoes in Remarque’s novels will make it easier for us to hear the noise that makes our times anything but quiet.

 

YOUTH PROGRAM

(Grades K-8)

Monfort Children’s Clinic Community Room

2:00 to 3:00 pm                                  

Speaking Truth to Power                                                              

Brian “Fox” Ellis

Fox will take us on a tour of the wonderful world of Quaker folktales and historical stories that focus on a non-violent response to potentially violent situations. From the Underground Railroad to the Quakers’ Witness for Peace, from Conscientious Objectors to more recent work in conflict resolution and anti-bullying campaigns, there have always been Quakers who dared to confront violence with the truth of their lives. The audience will visit pioneer homes in the Colonial wilderness and the fairy tale forest of the imagination. We will sing the songs of peace and join the march towards liberty. Fox will celebrate the freedoms that are the foundation of Quaker history through stories and songs. Blending non-fiction with folklore, poetry and music this program draws from the rich Quaker literary tradition and personal journals of abolitionists and activists. For All Ages!

 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2

 

YOUNG CHAUTAUQUA PRESENTATIONS               

Under the Big Tent

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

10:00 am to 4:00 pm                                                              

ALL AGES                              

High Plains Chautauqua is proud to present our Young Chautauqua scholars. These students have spent months reading, researching, and presenting their characters to different audiences. Young Chautauqua is a Colorado Humanities program that has been developed and supported by Greeley-Evans School District 6. Since the program began 17 years ago, approximately 13, 447 local students have participated, either as audience members or by researching and presenting a character.

This school year, 1709 students participated in 21 school programs. Teachers at each participating school worked with Young Chautauqua scholars. In addition, a Colorado Humanities-trained coach and local coaches worked with students and teachers to teach the Young Chautauqua model of learning history and to refine presentation skills of those who chose to present a character. Today’s portrayals are a sampling of the talented students who researched and developed a wide and interesting array of historic characters.                                            

 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2

 

EVENING PROGRAMS

6:15 to 9:00 pm

Under the Big Tent

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

                                                             

6:00 to 6:45 pm

Watch Your Step! Vintage Dance Vignettes                     

Vernon (1887-1918) and Irene Castle (1893-1969) came to fame in Parisian nightclubs, starred in Broadway revues, and went on to popularize "modern" dancing at their Castle House dance studio and supper club. They refined African-American ragtime and “animal” dances to make them acceptable in white society. The duo wowed audiences with their innovation and refinement until Vernon's tragic death in a military training center mid-air collision. After piloting 300 World War One combat missions with the Royal Flying Corps, Vernon had returned to the U.S. in 1917 to train American aviators.

Watch Your Step! will present the dances the Castles loved, including the eponymous Castle Walk, the half and half--an ingenious dance in 5/4 time, the tango from Argentina, and the Brazilian maxixe.

 

7:00 - 7:15 pm

Young Chautauqua Cameo

IRVING BERLIN

by Asher Hein

 

7:15 pm

SGT. HENRY JOHNSON (1892 - 1929)

by Keith Henley

 

8:20 pm

GENERAL JOHN J. PERSHING (1860 - 1948) 

by Ron Edgerton

Sponsored by the Tointon Family Foundation

 

THURSDAY, AUGUST 3
 

8:00 to 9:15 am

Coffee & Conversation with Chautauquans Dr. Ron Edgerton, Keith Henley, and Young Chautauquan Asher Hein

Cornerstone Building, Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

 

ADULT PROGRAMS

Cornerstone Building, Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

 

9:30 to 10:30 am                               

Winston Churchill as First Lord of the Admiralty and as Minister of Munitions

Kevin Radaker                                                           

In 1911, Winston Churchill was appointed First Lord of the Admiralty, a post he retained into the First World War.  During those years, he gave impetus to several reforms, including development of naval aviation, the tank, and the switch from coal to oil in almost all of the ships for the Royal Navy.  In short, Churchill’s innovations and strengthening of the navy prepared Britain well for the war, but he was forced to resign as First Lord of the Admiralty in May 1915 because of his role in the disastrous Dardanelles/Gallipoli campaign. Later in the war, in July 1917, Churchill was appointed Minister of Munitions.  Serving in that capacity, he repeated his advocacy of air power and the tank.  This presentation shall examine the technical innovations that he favored and the political infighting that led to his dismissal as First Lord of the Admiralty.

 

10:45 to 11:45 am                                                              

Pershing and Petraeus                                             

Ron Edgerton                                                             

Generals Jack Pershing and David Petraeus seem, at first look, to share little in common.  Pershing modeled strict discipline, unbending professionalism, an iron will, and a ramrod-straight bearing tailor made (as one critic has said) for monuments. Petraeus as a military man had more personal magnetism, and he inspired not just admiration and emulation but deep personal loyalty. He was also more genuinely a man of intellect, especially in problem solving a new American military strategy known as counterinsurgency warfare or COIN.

Despite their personality differences, these two men actually shared much in common.  Both were highly competitive, ambitious, and good at self-promotion, and they held themselves to very high standards. Likewise, both stressed rigorous training, professionalism, and absolute commitment to winning. Had they lived in the same era, they would have agreed on the urgent need for change in American military culture, for both saw themselves as reformers pitted against tradition-bound old army senior officers. 

Pershing and Petraeus would also have agreed on the crucial importance of counterinsurgency warfare as a strategy for successfully carrying out the American military’s mission in “small wars.” Petraeus co-wrote the new manual on counterinsurgency warfare in 2006. Over a century before that date, Pershing put into practice many of the main tenets of COIN. He did this as a captain leading American troops in fighting and then governing Moros (Moslems) in the Philippines. The similarities between Petraeus’ COIN in Afghanistan and Pershing’s Progressive counterinsurgency in the southern Philippines are remarkable. 

This presentation will compare and contrast modern COIN operational priorities with Pershing’s counterinsurgency practices a century before. It will suggest a century-long line of thinking and strategizing in the American military that hitherto has not been noted or discussed.

      

1:00 to 2:00 pm

Gallipoli                                                                              

J. Holmes Armstead

The Gallipoli campaign marks an early use of joint Commonwealth forces under Lt. General Sir Ian Hamilton designed to seize the Bosporus, the Dardanelles and the Gallipoli Peninsula and take the Ottoman Empire out of the war, thereby reducing the press of German military forces on the western front. The initial idea was promulgated by  

Minister for War, Field Marshall Horatio Lord Kitchener. However, with the failure of the operation, blame came to rest on First Lord of the Admiralty Winston Churchill, who was forced to resign as a consequence. The execution was a military disaster of the first magnitude. Vice Admiral, Sir John De Roebuck led the naval flotilla that supported the ill-fated operation which, though initially successful, was foiled by well-placed sea mines that sank three battleships.  Hamilton and De Roebuck established their respective commands on different ships and did not operate effectively together nor meld their respective staffs. The separate headquarters within the fleet, in an age before communications technology afforded effective command and control for such a complex amphibious operations, spelled disaster, given the lack of coordination and unity of command. An effective defense was mounted against the invasion by the commanding general of the Turkish Army 19th Division, Major General Mustapha Kemal.

 

2:15 to 3:15 pm                                                                     

Eugenics in the U.S. – Inspiration for Nazis?                               

Sally Ann Drucker

Margaret Sanger receives credit as a founder of the US birth control movement.  She also believed in eugenics, a movement which promoted birth control to prevent reproduction by those with "inferior" genes, including immigrants, the poor, and non-whites.  Emma Goldman, another founder of the birth control movement, saw it as every woman's right. With differing motives for advocating birth control, both women were often arrested.  In this workshop, we’ll examine the relationships between US birth control and eugenics movements and between US and Nazi eugenics movements.  Did the US eugenics movement perhaps inspire the infamous Nazi T4 program?   


THURSDAY, AUGUST 3

 

EVENING PROGRAMS

6:00 to 9:00 pm

Under the Big Tent

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

 

5:30-6:30 Food Tent Food Truck Night with:

Curbed Hunger

Sweaty Moose

Slawpy Barn

 

6:00 to 6:45 pm

Rodney Sauer

Ragtime and music for the silent films

 

7:00 - 7:15 pm

Young Chautauqua Cameo

JANE ADDAMS

by Margaret Herrick

 

7:15 pm

EDITH WHARTON (1862 - 1937)

by Amelia Wagner

 

8:20 pm

WOODROW WILSON (1856 – 1924)

by Judd Bankert

 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4


ADULT PROGRAMS

Greeley Senior Activities Center

Dining Room

1010  6th St.

 

8:00 to 9:15 am

Coffee & Conversation with Chautauquans Judd Bankert, Amelia Wagner, and Young Chautauquan Margaret Herrick

 

9:30 to 10:30 am                                

Winston Churchill’s Role in the Formation of the Modern Middle East  

Kevin Radaker                                                                      

In March of 1921, Winston Churchill, the newly appointed Colonial Secretary of England, called all the British military leaders and civil administrators in the Middle East to a conference in Cairo to examine and discuss several problems in the region. The decisions formulated during that conference and other actions carried out by Churchill during his time as Colonial Secretary served British interests rather than those of the populations concerned. For example, Churchill’s approval of the creation of Iraq has been criticized as having created an artificial state that inevitably would break down because of deep-seated animosities among tribes and factions that were ignored by those in attendance at the conference.  Arguably, such decisions have contributed to the unrest that exists in the Middle East today.    

 

10:45 to 11:45 am                             

Home from the War                        

Keith Henley

In spite of the many accomplishments that were made during the early 20th Century within the Negro community, the Negro was still denied equality in the military. All he wanted was to prove his loyalty and render his service to the aid of his country in the time of duress.  But in World War I, he was not permitted to fight side-by-side with white American soldiers.

Many Afro-American Troops were consigned to service details during the Great War.  They worked on the railroads and ports of France, but they saw little fighting.  The great exception to that rule was the 369th Regiment, initially recruited as the 15th New York Infantry.  Assigned to fight with the French, compelled to wear French uniforms and bear French arms, they became the most decorated American regiment in the war, known far and wide as the Harlem Rattlers or Harlem Hellfighters.

Although the Negro proved himself to be valiant during the war, when he returned to the U.S. there was no such respect given to the heroes of the 369th Infantry. They were denied military honors, faced unemployment, or in some cases lynched – some homecoming!

 

1:00 to 2:00 pm         

Edith Wilson, Our First Woman President           

Judd Bankert

On December 18, 1915, just a little over a year after his first wife died, President Wilson married Edith Bolling Galt Wilson, a widow sixteen years his junior. Less than four years later the President would suffer a debilitating stroke and his second wife would become what some have referred as the “first woman President.”

For months after his October 2, 1919 paralytic stroke no one, not even Wilson’s closest advisors, would be allowed to see him without Edith’s approval, and then only in her presence.  Even Cabinet members were relegated to communicating with the President “through” the First Lady. Not allowed to see the President, visitors instead presented their petitions to Edith, who would later report what the President wanted them to do.  “I studied every paper sent from the different Secretaries or Senators,” she wrote later of her role, “and tried to digest and present in tabloid form the things that, despite my vigilance, had to go to the President. I, myself, never made a single decision regarding the disposition of public affairs.”  Who was Edith Bolling Galt and what had prepared her to play this role? Was she, as she claimed, only a courier relaying communications between parties? What motivated her to assume this role of presidential gate-keeper, and did she use this opportunity to settle old scores? Based on our current knowledge of how best to help victims recover from similar strokes, was this isolation the best clinical treatment for the President? How was she able to keep Wilson’s personal physician and closest advisors from reporting the President’s true condition to others in the administration and to the public? Finally, what impact did Wilson’s continuation in office under these circumstances have on both national and international affairs? 

 

2:15 to 3:15 pm

Hoover and the World Disarmament Conference

Brian “Fox” Ellis as Herbert Hoover

Hear excerpts of Hoover’s speech to this prestigious gathering of world leaders as they vote on this world changing effort to limit their own military development after WWI. Based on his success with the 1930 London Naval Conference, Hoover negotiated with the superpowers of the world to reduce weaponry and eliminate chemical weapons at the 1932 World Disarmament Conference in Geneva. Hoover will share the story of what led up to the conference as well as some of its long term successes and failures.

 

 “We should lessen the danger of war by increasing defensive powers and decreasing offensive powers of nations. We would thus open new vistas of economic expansion for the world.” Herbert Hoover

Imagine sitting in the room in Geneva with world leaders from 33 nations including the Soviet Union, France, Germany, England and Japan. Hear excerpts of Hoover’s speech to this prestigious gathering as they vote on this world changing effort to limit their own military development after WWI. Hoover argues eloquently for a reduction in arms that will stimulate the economy and build true security through peace. Based on his success with the 1930 London Naval Conference, Hoover negotiated with the superpowers of the world to reduce weaponry and eliminate chemical weapons at the 1932 World Disarmament Conference. Hoover will share the story of what led up to the conference as well as some of its long term successes and failures.

Beginning as Hoover, Brian “Fox” Ellis will share a large portion of the speech, then step out of character to discern the successes and failures of disarmament, knowing that as nations abandoned the agreement in 1937, World War II began to heat up. And at the very end, Fox will lead a discussion on its repercussions for our current international agreements.

http://www.stateoftheunionhistory.com/2015/09/1932-herbert-hoover-world-disarmament.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Disarmament_Conference#/media/File:World_Disarmament_Conference_Low.jpg

 

YOUTH PROGRAM

(Grades K-8)

Farr Branch Library

 

2:00 to 3:00 pm                                 

Edith Wharton’s Childhood: Life in Victorian Times      

Amelia Wagner

Close your eyes and imagine you're a child living 150 years ago. Many things are different. Your house is lit by gas instead of electricity, you get from place to place by carriage instead of car, and you have probably never seen a telephone. Yet many things are the same. This is the world that Edith Wharton grew up in, and it's a world that greatly influenced her future writing.

This class will explore the many things that children did differently in the Victorian times, but it will also explore the many ways that Victorian children are just like us! We'll learn first hand what Victorian children ate, what they wore, what they learned about, and what games they played. We will also hear stories from Edith Wharton's own childhood. Come join us for a "bang up to the elephant" time!

Victorian dress is encouraged, but not required.

 

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4

EVENING PROGRAMS

6:00 to 9:00 pm

Under the Big Tent

Aims Community College

5401 W. 20th St.

 

5:30-6:30 Food Tent: Slawpy Barn

 

6:00 to 6:45 pm

Greeley Central High School Jazz I

Racial conditions in America and abroad during World War I gave rise to the jazz age of the Roaring Twenties. Poverty and racism in the South resulted in the Great Migration of African Americans, bringing New Orleans jazz to the North, notably to Chicago and New York.

On New Year’s Day in 1918, the 15th New York Regiment, nicknamed the Harlem Hellfighters, landed on the coast of Brittany, France, accompanied by a regimental band led by James Reese Europe. Mr. Europe was a hit abroad, with British, French and Italian bandmasters all wanting to imitate those hot new jazz sounds.

Greeley Central HS Jazz I, under the direction of Doug Farr, proudly represents the Greeley Central HS Arts Magnet program.

 

7:00 - 7:15 pm

Young Chautauqua Cameo

MARY ROBERTS RINEHART

by Kathryn Broderius

 

7:15 pm

EMMA GOLDMAN (1869 - 1940)

by Sally Ann Drucker

Sponsored by High Plains Library District

 

8:20 pm

ERICH MARIA REMARQUE (1898 - 1970)

by George Frein

 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 5
 

8:00 to 9:15 am

Coffee & Conversation with Chautauquans George Frein, Sally Ann Drucker, and Young Chautauquan Kathryn Broderius

Kress Cinema Lounge

817  8th Ave.

 

ADULT PROGRAMS

Morning: Kress Cinema

817  8th Ave.

          

9:30 to 10:30 am                                                                    

The Cinema Sees Action: Movies and the Great War  

David Caldwell

The Great War was the first conflict to unfold in the motion picture era. Cinema changed the way we look at war, but the First World War also changed the direction of the film industry, both in the US and Europe. It set the stage for a century of filmmaking style, combat narratives and reflections on the meaning of patriotism. Actors as diverse as Charlie Chaplin, Kirk Douglas and Brad Pitt have charged from the cinematic trenches. Follow film expert David Caldwell “Over There” and back again with clips and conversation about the Great War and great movies from 1918 to today.

Professor David Caldwell helped establish a program in Film Studies at the University of Northern Colorado and also offers courses in the Department of Modern Languages. In addition to his work with international cinema, Dr. Caldwell considers ways in which American films help tell national and global narratives.  

 

10:45 am to 11:45 pm                                    

The Great Migration and the Harlem Renaissance          

Keith Henley

(My edited version. Jane):

World War I not only changed the outlook of the world but it gave rise to a voice for the Negro in America. For many years since Reconstruction the Negro had fought trying to find his place in America. Although he had been shot down through racism, he continued to rise above his oppressors through faith, his strength, creativity, bravery, ingenuity, and the will to defeat the evil within as well as without. The Harlem Renaissance reveals such accomplishments by the Negro. We shall discuss those areas of strength through the voices of the day – such voices as, Alain Locke, Langston Hughes, Duke Ellington, Cab Calloway, Ethel Waters, Bessie Smith, Marcus Garvey, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Dr. Carter G. Woodson, just to name a few.

The war also had an effect on the economics within the Negro community. This conflict allowed Negroes to reestablish themselves and create new opportunities by leaving various parts of the South and relocating to various large cities in the North, such as New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, and Detroit. The war also enhanced the racism in America with Jim Crow and Ku Klux Klan. In spite of all this discrimination, the Negro still rose above his oppressors.

 

Afternoon: Greeley Senior Activities Center Dining Room, 1010  6th St.

 

[Normal parking restrictions in the Senior Activities Center parking lot will be waived during] [HPC programs on Saturday, August 6. Entry to the lot is on 6th Street, between 10th and 11th   ] [Avenues.                                                                                                                                   ]

 

1:00 to 2:00 pm                                         

Edith Wharton: Feminism and Design                   

Amelia Wagner

Scholars have argued bitterly over whether or not Edith Wharton can be viewed as a feminist. Wharton herself certainly never claimed to be one. Yet the presence of exceptionally strong female characters in most of her stories, combined with some of Wharton's personal decisions, leaves the question begging to be answered: what was the relationship of Edith Wharton to the burgeoning feminist movement? Was she, as some have argued, a strong, liberated woman, who paved the way for other strong, liberated women by choices and opinions that were ahead of her time? Or was she, as others have said, a constricted and frigid traditionalist, clinging to the mores of the past? 

This lecture will try to answer some of these questions. To do so, we will focus on an important, though oft forgotten, portion of Edith's life: interior design. Many scholars have recognized that Wharton's first love was interior design (a profession which she helped to develop), and this love is integral to Wharton's writing. Wharton consistently reveals as much about her characters by where she has them live and their opinions on decor as by what she has them do or say. Thus, we will consider what feminist standards Wharton does or does not meet in her role as interior designer; more importantly, we will examine the clues she leaves us about her ideas of what a woman should be in her description of her characters and their houses.  Come prepared to delve into Wharton's works,  critics' analysis, and Wharton's personal life with an aim to discover Edith Wharton's opinion on feminism.

 

2:15 to 3:15 pm                                                             

A Meeting with Hitler

George Frein                                                                          

From its beginning, World War II was an echo of World War I.  

This illustrated program will tell the story of the day World War II began in Europe.

That day is usually given as September 1, 1939 when German forces invaded Poland, but I suggest that the war began at a meeting on February 12, 1938. The meeting was between German Chancellor Adolf Hitler and the Chancellor of Austria, Kurt von Schuschnigg.  

The meeting did not go well for Schuschnigg. Hitler soon invaded Austria and Schuschnigg spent the war in concentration camps. After the war, Schuschnigg came to America and taught at St. Louis University where I took two courses from him and learned his story of World War II. I will tell his story in this program.

 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 5

 

EVENING PROGRAMS

5:45 to 9:00 pm

Under the Big Tent, Aims Community College

 

5:30-6:30 Food Tent: Kenny’s Steakhouse Catering

 

6:15 to 6:45 pm

Greeley Harmonix                                                          

Greeley Harmonix, a women's a cappella chorus, will entertain the audience with a World War Medley from WWI, plus songs with similar sentiments from other eras.  They will also perform songs that honor our country and pay homage to veterans from all wars and services.

Greeley Harmonix has placed in the top 3 small choruses in the five-state Regional Competitions every year since chartered by Sweet Adelines International in 2011.   The chorus is led by Julie Palagi, a certified director with over 30 years of experience.          

 

7:00 - 7:15 pm

Young Chautauqua Cameo

ALBERT EINSTEIN

by Martin Lahman

 

7:15 pm

LEGENDARY LADIES

Sponsored by the Richard and Mary Kemme Family Foundation

 

EILLIS MEREDITH (1865 - 1955) by Kathy Swafford

DOC SUSIE ANDERSON (1870 - 1960) by Joyce Nelson

EMILY GRIFFITH (1868 - 1947) by Linda Gleichmann

ANNOUNCER Sue Ann Schenk

 

ABOUT THE LEGENDARY LADIES

The Legendary Ladies, Inc., a non-profit, educational performance organization, celebrated 25 years of living history in 2017. The group is comprised of about 18 women of all ages who not only portray over 35 characters, but also volunteer their time for research, script writing, rehearsal, and costume creation. In the program, “Unconventional Women of the West”, an announcer introduces four to seven characters, depending on show length. Then, these featured individuals come alive via historically accurate monologues, each about 7-8 minutes long. By providing several vignettes during a single performance, audiences learn about a variety of extraordinary ladies and are often inspired to read more about them.

 

8:20 pm

HERBERT HOOVER (1974 - 1964)

by Brian “Fox” Ellis